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Georgetown McDonough School of Business David Booth

Online MS in Finance Courses

A Comprehensive, Career-Driven Curriculum

The Master of Science in Finance (MSF) online program focuses on a global outlook, practical application, real-world trends and the importance of ethics to deliver a comprehensive and career-focused education.

The world-class MSF curriculum consists of 32 credits over 20 months: six core courses, a weeklong On-site Residency and the Global Consulting Project.

The MSF Curriculum At-A-Glance

Program Component

Detail

Credits

Core Curriculum

Financial Markets

3

 

Financial Accounting

3

 

Corporate Finance

3

 

Financial Econometrics

3

 

Advanced Corporate Valuation and Modeling

3

 

Principled Financial Leadership

3

On-site Requirements

On-site Campus Residency [one week]

2

Program Selectives

Selective 1

3

 

Selective 2

3

 

Selective 3

3

Capstone

Global Consulting Project

3

Total

 

32

Semester structure: 3-credit courses offered in 7-week modules

Experience Georgetown University: On-site Residency

This weeklong residency occurs after students complete their first two core courses: Financial Markets and Financial Accounting. While on the Georgetown University campus, students will work together on a case study competition, experience the Georgetown University campus, and get better acquainted with their classmates and professors.

Go Abroad with the Global Consulting Project

This capstone project challenges students with an invaluable real-world experience. Drawing upon the skills you have learned throughout the program, you will conduct a consulting project for a firm in another country. Students will research the history, business, political and regulatory environment of the client’s country as well consult with them via e-mail, phone and live video. The project concludes with a weeklong visit to the client’s country during which the students will finalize their project, present it to the client, and enjoy business and cultural site visits.

The Six Core Courses

Financial Markets

This course begins with a review of the building block concept of the time value of money and quickly moves onto bond and stock valuation; the relation between risk and return; and the ongoing debate about the workings of financial markets according to the Efficient Market Hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis of Behavioral Finance.

Learning Outcomes of Financial Markets

  • Value stocks and bonds using classic techniques and be aware of the implications of the latest research:
    • Rank different streams of cash flows.
    • Value government and corporate bonds.
    • Have a deep understanding of the Treasury yield curve.
    • Value stocks.
    • Estimate returns and risks of individual securities.
    • List and explain the benefits of diversification.
    • Estimate the efficient frontier using the Markowtiz constrained optimization technique.
    • Estimate returns and risks of portfolios.
    • Discuss and apply the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM).
    • Discuss and apply alternatives to the CAPM such as the Fama and French 3-Factor Model.
    • Have a deep understanding of the efficient market hypothesis.
    • Understand how to compute alpha and the joint hypothesis problem.
    • List and explain the key building blocks of the competing hypothesis of behavioral finance.
  • Identify relevant information and tools needed to solve complex financial problems.
  • Apply tools to personal financial decision making.
  • Make informed decisions and articulate the appropriate

Financial Accounting

This course focuses on the accumulation, analysis and presentation of relevant accounting data of an enterprise and how it is used to serve the needs of managers, shareholders, creditors and external analysts.

Learning Outcomes of Financial Accounting

  • Discuss and understand the role of accounting in providing information for financial managers, investors, equity analysts, and creditors.
  • Apply the fundamental accounting concepts and principles to concrete business problems.
  • Discuss the elements of financial statements and the implications of management judgment and choice in accounting measurement.
  • Describe how managers might employ opportunistic behavior (earnings management) to further their own gain, avoid unwanted attention, and report the firm in the best possible way.
  • Create financial statements.
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate accounting information in the context of concrete business problems.
  • Describe and understand international differences in accounting.
  • Describe and understand the facets of multinational accounting.
  • Discuss ethical and social issues and the macro implications of accounting.

Corporate Finance

Building on the previous core courses, this course shows you how to maximize shareholder wealth within a legal and ethical framework. Topics covered include capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, payout policy and the fundamentals of derivative pricing.

Learning Outcomes of Corporate Finance

  • Describe the different facets of agency conflicts between managers, shareholders, and debtholders.
  • Explain how the goal of shareholder wealth maximization does not necessarily conflict with stakeholder wealth maximization.
  • Use the NPV capital budgeting criterion and demonstrate why it is the best criterion.
  • Compute a project’s internal rate of return (IRR) and understand its shortcomings as a capital budgeting criterion.
  • Compute the Payback Period and understand its drawbacks as a capital budgeting criterion.
  • Follow the rules for the correct application of the NPV criterion.
  • Assess the consequences of parameter estimation error for capital budgeting decisions.
  • Describe the MM Capital Structure Propositions and the guidance they provide to valuing a levered firm.
  • Estimate a firm’s appropriate capital structure.

Financial Econometrics

Focusing on the art and science of making sense of financial data, this course teaches students how to build and analyze large databases using advanced econometric techniques.

Advanced Corporate Valuation and Modeling

This course covers advanced valuation topics such as the free cash flow approach to equity valuation, the use of accounting and market data to measure and manage the value of the firm, and parameter estimation errors in valuation.

Learning Outcomes of Advanced Corporate Valuation and Modeling

  • Describe and explain two fundamental drivers of corporate value: Return on Invested Capital (ROIC) and Organic Revenue Growth.
  • Describe and discuss operating performance of the entire firm and of individual business units.
  • Rearrange the balance sheet to find invested capital.
  • Rearrange the income statement to find net operating profit after tax (NOPAT).
  • Analyze a firm’s historical performance through traditional ratio analysis and through ROIC decomposition.
  • Build an integrated valuation model using discounted cash flow analysis in order to value a publicly traded company and its equity:
    • Forecast key variables.
    • Develop pro forma financial statements.
    • Determine the appropriate forecast period.
    • Estimate continuing value.
    • Derive a firm’s weighted average cost of capital.
    • Derive and discount estimated cash flows.
  • Discuss and describe nuances of continuing value estimation.
  • Conduct multiples (or relative) valuation to triangulate valuation estimate.
  • Discuss and describe the nuances of multiples valuation (imbedded assumptions, leverage effects, etc).
  • Perform sensitivity analysis to pinpoint key value drivers for the firm.
  • Examine the robustness

Principled Financial Leadership

Designed to train women and men to lead with integrity, this course focuses on ethical challenges faced by leaders of financial firms or by leaders in finance positions at non-financial firms.

Program Selectives

Based on student interest and faculty recommendations, the MSF I class has three selectives:

    1. Private Equity Real Estate and Advanced Financial Modeling

    2. Investments

    3. Option Pricing and Risk Management

Additional choices may be added for future cohorts based on the level of student interest.

MSF Calendars and Schedules

 

McDonough School of Business
290 37th and O Streets, N.W., Washington D.C. 20057
Phone: (202) 687.4200
Fax: (202) 687.5555

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The online MSF is approved for most states in the US, but is still awaiting full approval from a few select states. Please contact (866) 531-4825 or click here to determine if you are located in a state in which Georgetown University can confer a degree.